Diamondback Forum

The Diamondback Firearms => DB15 => Topic started by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:40:06 PM

Title: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:40:06 PM
Hey team! I'm new here, and just purchased my first AR, so forgive any ignorance you spot in this thread. I just wanted a place where I could share some lessons learned and ask questions for others who have picked up this same gun. It's probably important to share that my main purpose for this rifle is coyote and hog hunting, more so than competitions or a range toy. I also wanted to keep costs to a minimum, so I'll be looking for stuff that works but I'm willing to sacrifice that last 20% in function to save 50% in cost.

Since I'm new to the whole AR world, I wanted to start with something entry-level and affordable, but plan to build something nicer in the future. That said, after a bunch of research and gun-holding at my local stores, I decided on the Diamondback DB15CCB (https://diamondbackfirearms.com/collections/db15-rifle-series/products/diamondback-db15ccb?variant=29811046348). I picked one up for about $500 at Rural King (http://www.rkguns.com/diamondback-db15-223-5-56-ar-15-rifle-db15ccb.html), which I would never have thought of as a gun shop, but they had great prices, $10 shipping on guns, and a smooth process to order online and then pickup at their store.

(http://gdurl.com/VMG8)
(http://gdurl.com/vL8C)

My initial impression of the rifle was that it was a nice balance between raw basics, and simple but useful upgrades. There was a little wobble in the stock when fully extended and a tiny bit of "play" between the upper and lower receivers, but nothing that caused concern. The edges on the rails were a bit sharp, but I'm usually hunting with gloves on, so that didn't bother me either. It came with a collapsible stock, dust cover, A2 flash hider, 16" barrel, and quad rail. It felt well balanced in the shoulder and I liked the way that it looked, so it was a good start right out of the box.

I'll add some other stuff in my next post, but in the meantime, please feel free to add suggestions, make corrections to my AR newbieness, or post your own experiences with the Diamondback DB15CCB rifle. Thanks, everybody  :main_good:
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:44:24 PM
The first thing I needed to do was put on a primary optic, and I decided to splurge a bit on the Nikon (http://www.nikonsportoptics.com/en/nikon-products/product/null/m-223-4-16x42-nikoplex.html) M-223 4-16x42 scope with the Nikoplex system. I picked one up at Optics Planet (http://shop.opticsplanet.com/nikon-m-223-4-16x42mm-rifle-scope.html?_iv_code=NI-RS-MNKOP-8493&utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=plusbox-beta&gclid=CjwKEAiAxKrFBRDm25f60OegtwwSJABgEC-Z9jETaFbMo5FQYjghIUbtE34t4uic56k7iiTbkSQ9VBoCBs3w_wcB) for $450 with free shipping.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/G/01/stores/sport-goods/detail-pages/nikon-m223-reticle-nikoplex.gif)

(http://cdn-7.nikon-cdn.com/Images/Promos/Mount_Em_Up_2014/M-223_3-12x42_Niko_intro_image.png)

(https://www.all4shooters.com/en/Shooting/optics/Nikon-M-223-4-16%C3%9742-Nikoplex-riflescope/Nikon-M-223-4-16%C3%9742-Nikoplex-2.jpg?resize=930x870%3E)

I thought their Nikoplex was really cool and all of the reviews I could find showed that it was accurate as described. They say to use a 55-grain ballistic-tipped bullet shooting at 3,240 FPS and then the scope is supposed to be calibrated such that you sight it in at 100 yards, reset the adjustable turrets, and then it's marked for 100, 200, 300... out to 600 yards. It's nice that you can make a turret adjustment for distance and then quickly set it back to your 100-yard zero. Most major ammo manufacturers produce this exact type of bullet with this rated velocity, so there are lots of choices that still comply with Nikon's advice. This is a pretty cool promo video from Nikon, testing their M-223 scopes at the range.

video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IvskI-oWjJM)

*** UPDATE - 03/07/2017 ***
I sent a note to Nikon customer service recently, asking them about their rating for the M223 Nikoplex. They say to use a 55-grain bullet fired at 3240 FPS. There are lots of ammo manufacturers producing that exact load, but none of them actually fire at 3240 out of most ARs. I was curious, so I asked if the velocity was actual (i.e. chronograph) or as advertised on the ammo boxes. Their response states that the 3240 velocity is what's coming out of the rifle and not what's advertised - not all that surprised. So be aware that, unless you have a 20"+ barrel on your AR, you'll have to really push to get loads coming out at the speed. Or you can use their SpotOn software and input your actual ammo data, and then for $100 they'll send you custom turrets. That's not in the budget right now, especially after just dropping $400+ on their scope. Maybe it's possible to find a 50-grainer that's going faster to make up the difference? I'll do some work on that and report back.

*** UPDATE - 03/13/2017 ***
If you scroll down to reply #24 on this thread you'll see the answer to my question above. It turns out that, of the ammo I've tested so far, the 50-grain Remington AccuTip-V and 50-grain American Eagle AR15 Tipped Varmint bullets produces the best groups and are most closely matched (+/- 1.5") to the Nikoplex scope turrets out to and including 300 yards. That said, there's much more detail and data below.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:46:09 PM
Next I needed to find a good scope mount, so I picked up a one-piece mount by TMS on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/TMS-Piece-Mount-Picatinny-Rails/dp/B002BLLFQE) for $25. I always used a two-piece mount in the past but some research convinced me that a good one-piece mount might be better. The one I purchased looked good and had good reviews, so I gave it a shot. While mounting the scope, the only thing that I didn't like is that the metal rings were the larger diameter, so they include plastic inserts to reduce the diameter for smaller scope tubes. They also include one top-half of a ring with a picatinny rail on top, so you can mount a light or laser on top of your scope if you want to. I just used the regular rings and started mounting it up. The other things that were in the mount box were a couple of small pieces of nylon or silk, or some thin, black material that was soft. There were no references to this in the instructions, so my only guess is that these pieces can be put between the rings and the scope to prevent the scope from being scratched. That's what I did, anyways, and it seemed to work fine. I was nervous about just having a single screw holding the mount to the gun, but after torquing it down, it all felt solid. I did have to crank down the rings a little tighter than I normally like to ensure that the scope wouldn't move or turn, but nothing that set off a red flag.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81VMkRr9ExL._SL1500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:47:07 PM
So now I have my gun, with a nice scope mounted, and I'm off to the range. First order of business is to find some cheap target ammo so I can start having some fun! I snagged some reasonably inexpensive ammo to get started - Norma USA (https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1311447386/norma-usa-tac-223-ammunition-223-remington-55-grain-full-metal-jacket) TAC223 55 grain FMJ - for about $9 per box mainly to learn the operations of an AR rifle and to make sure my scope was close to zero before working on some better and more expensive hunting ammo.

(https://media.midwayusa.com/productimages/880x660/Primary/436/436374.jpg)

I set up the bench at 25 yards and my first shot was perfect left/right but a few inches low. That seemed about right for me, so I backed up to 50 yards and was about an inch low, and then back to 100 yards where I was right on. I'll chalk this up to luck because I've sighted in enough guns to know that this is never the case :-) I reset the scope turrets so that the line was set at the 100-yard mark and then locked the turret back down. The gun fired well and I had no issues with jams or failures-to-fire, so I could not have been happier with this first data point.

(http://gdurl.com/SFJo)
(http://gdurl.com/jETG)

*** UPDATE - 8/9/2017 ***
After burning through my original stockpile of NormaUSA ammo, I thought I'd research some other potentially cheaper options. I was pointed to one option via a YouTube video, suggesting that Wolf's "Gold" ammo is really good, clean, reliable and... cheap. They make a 55-grain FMJ bullet with brass cartridge that I found online for $5.50 per box of 20, or roughly $0.27 per round. By comparison, the American Eagle Tipped Varmint (i.e. budget) ammo I've selected for hunting is about $11 per box of 20, or $0.55 per round. So for half the cost, this stuff sounds like a good bet for plinking and warming up the ol' barrel. I just picked some up via AmmoSeek (http://www.ammoseek.com) and will let y'all know how it shoots in my DB15CCB.

(https://gun.deals/sites/default/files/Image1_ss693.128.jpg)

*** UPDATE - 11/10/2017 ***
I had a chance to shoot some Wolf Gold ammo today and, unfortunately, I was disappointed. I shot a 20-round box at 100 yards and they sprayed all across the target. I was using a solid bench and a lead-sled as I normally do, and it wasn't really that windy, so I'm going to blame the ammo on this one. I'll give it another shot but as of right now I have to say "no go" on the Wolf Gold. That said, while accuracy was an issue, my DB15CCB cycled this stuff with no problems whatsoever and it appears to be fairly clean burning stuff.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:47:43 PM
My next move was to add a couple cool but inexpensive components to the AR. After all, that's one of the best things about an AR (as I understand it); the ability to add and customize in a million different ways. The first thing I did was add an anti-reflection device (ARD) to the front of my scope so the coyotes wouldn't see me on a sunny day. Luckily, my Nikon scope came with a pretty nice one, so I found that in the scope box and put it on. The one they give you appears to be a SunGuard KillFlash ARD Nightforce, or at least it looks just like the one shown on Misway USA (http://www.midwayusa.com/product/352777/sunguard-killflash-ard-anti-reflection-device-nightforce-nxs-50mm-objective)'s website. It's listed for $100 on their site, which seems crazy to me, but if so that was a very nice freebie from Nikon. It took a little elbow grease the get the plastic threads of the ARD onto the scope, but it did go all the way on. The finish doesn't match the scope, but I plan on camo'ing the gun eventually, so I wasn't worried about this. It does work well against glare, though, and it doesn't seem to impair the picture through the scope at all.

(https://media.midwayusa.com/productimages/880x660/Primary/352/352777.jpg)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:48:13 PM
Next I wanted to add a flashlight to the gun, since I do a fair amount of my coyote hunting at night. I looked around on Amazon and found a handful of lights that all looked the same but were priced very differently. I decided to try one of the cheaper options as the specs all looked the same, and it was called the WindFire Green (https://www.amazon.com/WindFire-Green-Coyote-Hunting-Light/dp/B00Q2BTXVS/ref=sr_1_2?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1487610914&sr=1-2&keywords=hunting&tag=vglnk-c102-20 light green) hunting light, listed for $38 and free shipping. This light supposedly has a CREE brand LED, which are good ones, and it came with a rechargeable battery, pressure switch, battery charger, and a couple of mounting brackets. I added it to the bottom rail using one of the included mounts and installed the pressure switch adapter. The mount worked fine but the screw threads on it scratched the finish on my rail a touch. Not a huge deal, but enough for me to knock their online review down to 4-stars. I ran the wire and pressure switching between the upper and left rails and used a long but thin piece of electrical tape wrapped around the forearm to hold it in place. It looks nice and the pressure switch works really well. The battery came fully charged and everything worked as advertised. The light was really bright, too, so I was very happy with the performance. It adds a little weight at the front of the barrel, which changes the balance a bit, but I typically shoot off of shooting-sticks, so I wasn't worried.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71XtlanHnIL._SL1000_.jpg)

*** UPDATE - 03/12/2017 ***
For some reason, the pressure switch for my light stopped working today. It worked fine yesterday, but today, nothing. I charged the battery and tried the regular on/off switch and it worked; then tried the pressure switch again and nothing. As I was unscrewing the cap attached to the pressure switch, the wire detached and looked to have broken completely. I'll be sending it back to Amazon; will keep you posted as to their response. In the meantime, at least I still have a functioning light, but not exactly how I want it. More to come :main_undecided_ncc:

*** UPDATE - 03/14/2017 ***
The company that sells this flashlight finally began offering replacement LED bulbs in different colors, so I was able to purchase a red version (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00RYHFZ4I/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1) for $13 with free shipping. Now I'll be able to switch out the green and red bulbs, in case I want to use red for coyotes and green for hogs. I'm not totally sure if it's necessary or not, but to be honest, it's cool! And instead of buying two flashlights, now I can have just one with dual purpose. Still no word back from Amazon on a new pressure switch, though.

*** UPDATE - 04/01/2017 ***
Good news - my new red LED bulb arrived from China. It was very easy to switch the bulbs and the red bulb is every bit as bright as the green one. I'm glad I now have the flexibility of switching between red and green, depending on my targets that evening.

Bad news - still nothing back from Amazon or their seller on the broken pressure switch. I've tried several times via several avenues and have never gotten so much as an auto-response. I'll try once more, but beware... the customer service here is terrible.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:48:48 PM
Now I wanted to use a secondary optic to address the issue that all coyote hunters have at some time in their careers... those instances where your scope is cranked down to 16x and you're watching something 300 yards out, and then all of the sudden, a yote is 25 yards away staring at your caller. All you see in the scope is fur and you miss that shot more often than not. I had seen on a TV show where a guy used a 45-degree offset mount and a red-dot sight so that, in those instances, you can just twist the gun to the left while it's in your shoulder, maintain cheek weld, look down the red-dot, and then have a chance to get on that close dog without touching your primary scope. I found a 45-degree offset mount on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0155THT1I/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1&tag=vglnk-c102-20) for $9 with free shipping and then started doing some research on sights.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61qiNX-a3tL._SL1200_.jpg)

Like scopes, you can pick a sight that's anywhere from $10 up to $500, so again I decided to stay on the lower end to start. I found one on Amazon called Ohuhu Reflex Sight (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00YRIHYIW/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1&tag=vglnk-c102-20) for $20 and free shipping, and I liked that it had multiple settings for the sight shape and could switch between green and red colors for day vs. night hunting. The sight came with the mounting equipment, so I put the 45-degree mount on the top rail, at the far end of the rail, so the angled mount faced towards the right. Then I screwed on the reflex sight and it looked great! The sight picture was clear and the settings all worked great. The only thing I didn't like was that I had to raise my head up a tiny bit to catch the reflex sight correctly. Since this is for close-range shooting only, I don't think it'll be a big deal, but I wish I could find an offset mount that is more low-profile so I could keep my natural cheek-weld and not have to lift my head at all. Something to work on in the future, I guess!

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61PtdyuQEsL._SL1049_.jpg)

*** UPDATE - 03/06/2017 ***
I started having issues with my red dot sight not holding its zero. I emailed the seller on Amazon and they quickly sent me a replacement sight (without asking for the old one back), so I guess this is a common issue for them. I found one thread online where a guy mentioned having to tighten the "set screw" to fix this issue, but the seller couldn't tell me what that meant. When I got the new one in, I decided to do some experimenting to see if I could fix the issue. It turns out there there's a screw that you access from the bottom of the sight, so you have to remove it from your rail, that must work loose over time (see photo below). If you tighten that screw, then the sight becomes solid again and works fine. Now I guess I have an extra red-dot sight; maybe I'll try that on my turkey gun this spring!

(http://gdurl.com/l6Ds)

*** UPDATE - 03/12/2017 ***
After trying out my backup red-dot sight a bunch of times, I just can't seem to get comfortable with it. The sight "window" is a little too high and I have to raise my head off the stock to see. Plus, when it's fast and furious, I struggled to find the red dot. I could probably find a lower-profile sight, but they are a lot more expensive, so I'm working on another angle. I'm considering moving to 45-degree offset iron sights, as there are some good ones out there at a reasonable price. I was looking for something specific to solve this problem and couldn't find it anywhere, so I might also be working on a new product concept now too :main_smile: The good news is that I tried this red dot on my turkey gun and it works really well, so that setup will stay, but this one is going bye bye.

*** UPDATE - 04/03/2017 ***
My prototype of a backup sight is now complete! I'm already writing up the patent but the gist of it is this: an offset mount with a shotgun-style fiber optic bead. It won't be quite as accurate as offset rifle front/rear sights, but I think it'll be close enough for charging coyotes and it's so much faster acquiring the sight and target than anything else I've used before. People have been asking for years for a fiber optic bead to be mounted on a picatinny rail, so now they'll have it. I'm going to test it at the range soon, so I'll report back on the results.

(http://gdurl.com/m7H3)

(http://gdurl.com/XcKA)

*** UPDATE - 4/17/2017 ***
I was out at the range today and wanted to give my new backup sight a test. At first I tried using it like a shotgun sight, putting the bead right where I wanted the bullet to hit, but I found the impacts to be maybe 6-10" high on the paper. Then I adjusted, thinking of the paper as a coyote trotting by at 20 yards and aimed the bead so I could see the whole "coyote" and the impacts were all in the theoretical boiler room. This isn't precision shooting here, folks... just something to help level the playing field when a 'yote sneaks in at close range. A favorite movie quote that applies in those situations: "I'm too close for missiles, Goose; switching to guns..."

*** UPDATE - 8/9/2017 ***
I wasn't totally happy with the accuracy on my little "invention", so I decided to try one last idea for my backup offset sights. After reading lots of reviews and watching lots of YouTube videos, I settled on some offset rifle sights on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01JKKXG6U) for $33. I'll give them a shot at the range and see if I have better luck. Will report back on the results!

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81Q22c8IG-L._SL1500_.jpg)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:49:16 PM
This one is a bit picky, but the trigger guard that came on the rifle was just a straight piece of aluminum, so there wasn't a big opening around the trigger. At the range in the summertime, that's fine, but when I'm coyote hunting in zero-degree weather, I need some room for my big gloves to fit in there. I found a replacement trigger guard with a curved shape that did the trick for $8 and free shipping on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007W65EXS/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o00_s01?ie=UTF8&psc=1&tag=vglnk-c102-20). If you can't tell by now, there are parts available on Ebay and Amazon for cheap. I'm not saying these are the best products on the market, but they work, or at least all the ones I've tried thus far have worked.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41uTn0YZKWL._SL1000_.jpg)

This should be fairly easy to replace. You use a small punch to push out the rear pin and then use the end of a pen to push the spring-loaded front pin until the thing comes loose. The new guard went into the front pin easily, but for some dumb reason, I tried using the original rear pin instead of the one that came with the new guard, and the hole must have been a slightly different size, because it got stuck. Then I had the bright idea that I'd use the new pin and push it in from the other side, both pushing out the bad pin and seating the new one in a single victory. Wrong! The two pins bound up and I couldn't get either out. I gave one more tap with the hammer out of desperation, and this time it broke the "ear" off the opposite side of the trigger :Main_thumbdown2: This really sucks, because it's part of the lower receiver, so you can't just replace a little part to fix this one. The only good news was that I was now able to get the new trigger guard off the gun, so it was infinitely easier to work on now.

I cleaned up the two broken edges with some alcohol and then used a bit of Gorilla Glue to put them back together. With a couple of splints setup to hold the piece perfectly in place, I left the glue to set while I tackled the two pins stuck in my trigger guard. I ended up having to use a vice and pliers to pull one out and then had to really hammer with a punch to get the other out. The glue seemed to set really well on the broken ear, so I put the new trigger guard back in, starting with the front spring pin. I opted for a solid, 1/8" stainless pin from my local hardware store instead of the cheap roll pins normally used for the rear, and gently tapped it in with a punch. I placed a small piece of black tape over that side of the trigger, just in case my glue let go, so I wouldn't loose the broken ear in the field. That said, the glue has held up well so far (knock on wood!) and I do like the new trigger guard... but, man, it was so much more painful that it should have been. It turns out that this is a somewhat common issue, at least based on this thread (http://www.calguns.net/calgunforum/archive/index.php/t-331146.html), so if you try this replacement please be careful NOT to hammer that rear roll pin too hard. Also, be sure to separate the upper and lower receivers when doing this so your optics don't take any abuse when you're tapping (lightly!) on that real roll pin.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:49:49 PM
The last two items I wanted to tackle in the first round were the two wobble points: between the receivers and in the stock. The stock was pretty easy - I found online where guys had removed the extension piece of the stock, exposing the tube itself. Then you take the soft side of some sticky velvro tape and put it across the top of the tube, length-wise. I used one of my girlfriend's leg razors to trim down the soft material until the extension piece would go back on the tube. It is a lot harder to extend and retract now, but I only use it fully extended, so it doesn't matter to me and now the wobble is gone.

The wobble between the upper and lower receivers was another story. I know it doesn't impact accuracy at all, but it bothers me, so I went at it. First I bought a little piece online that some people swear buy called an Accu Wedge. I think I paid $7 with free shipping on Ebay (https://rover.ebay.com/rover/1/711-53200-19255-0/1?type=3&campId=5337559805&toolId=10001&customId=izfv05ujqc00zk8a00004&mpre=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.ebay.com%2Fitm%2FErgo-Grips-4988-Accu-Wedge-Upper-Lower-Tightener-No-Slop-Anti-Wobble-5-56-223-%2F331884744884%3Fhash%3Ditem4d45df50b4:g:CYsAAOSw3YNXZLmh) for mine, but when I installed it, I couldn't get the rear take-down pin to close. So per their instructions, I trimmed a tiny bit of rubber off, and put it back in. Now the rear pin closes, but the wobble was still there. Ok, throw that in the garbage :main_angry:

(https://media.mwstatic.com/product-images/880x660/alt1/518/webp/518277a1.webp)

*** UPDATE - 02/27/2017 ***
I read that you can use a small rubber o-ring around where the front take-down pin is, so I tried that. I basically got the smallest one I could find for like $0.25 at the hardware store and it worked! It took a little more pressure to close the back pin, but it didn't seem like an issue or like I was creating any issues, so I went with it and it was the magic fix... for as long as that o-ring survives anyways.

(http://gdurl.com/mhLa)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:50:57 PM
I was trying to find a way to "soften" the quad-rail grip on the forearm where the rails are cut sharply. I found some rail ladders online that are made of rubber and fit in the gaps in the rail, but they were pretty expensive. Then I found some equivalents on Ebay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/262606985723?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&var=561494323453&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT) and decided to try them for $3 and free shipping. I got the tan ones and they look awesome on my rails. They fit perfectly and I really like the way they feel and the way they look, so it was a nice addition to cap off this first wave up add-ons.

(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/IsAAAOSwLVZVyU9N/s-l1600.jpg)

*** UPDATE - 03/01/2017 ***
I ended up buying another set of these so I could carefully cut them around my scope mount and offset mount; a pair of sharp scissors will get that job done pretty easily. The finished product looks really nice; I couldn't be happier with this purchase!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:51:35 PM
With my gun more or less ready to tackle some action, I needed to figure out the best way to haul it around. Even though the gun is pretty light on its own, by the time I put on the scope, red dot, flashlight, etc. it was starting to get a bit heavy. I always thought the single-point slings looked cool and some folks online said they worked for hunting, so I picked up a sling on Amazon for about $20 all in. It's tan, has some bungee in it, and uses what seems like a solid latch to hold onto the gun. Unfortunately it's no longer available on Amazon, so I can't share a link for this item. Anyways, I thought I was all set, until I tried to attach it to the gun and realized that... oops... there's nowhere to clip on to!

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41Nej2TqlWL.jpg)

After a bit of quick research I realized that I needed to change out my receiver end plate, so I snagged a Tapco (http://www.tapco.com/products/end-plate-sling-adapter.html) one for about $12. There are a ton of videos on YouTube about how to install these and the only real trick is that you'll need to grab a stock wrench like this one (http://www.avantlink.com/click.php?tt=cl&pw=55963&ctc=izfv3c1mzj00zk8a00y51&mi=10077&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.brownells.com%2Fgunsmith-tools-supplies%2Frifle-tools%2Fwrenches%2Fm4-stock-wrench-sku739000010-16882-41045.aspx), which cost me about $10, but I cannot find the exact one I purchased.

(http://gdurl.com/YX9i)

Once you have that tool and the new end plate, it takes about 10 minutes from start to finish to make the switch. And then the sling worked great, even when hiking around coyote hunting. Just make sure you have the sling sized as small as you can make it for your body, as that will keep it from bouncing on your knees when you're walking in the woods. The only downside I've noticed is that, when you bend down to setup your caller or drop your seat cushion, you really have to be careful that the end of your barrel doesn't go into the mud.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:52:10 PM
As far as magazines go, the one that came with my DB15CCB is pretty cheap looking, but it works fine. I kept hearing about Magpul (https://www.walmart.com/ip/Magpul-PMAG-30-AR-M4-Gen-M2-MOE-5-56x45-MAG571-BLK/135052118) magazines so I picked one up at Walmart for $25. It feels a little more solid and looks cooler, for sure, but I think the only real advantage is that you can see through the side to tell how many rounds are left in that mag. Other than that, though, it’s just nice to have an extra in the case for a rainy day.

(https://i5.walmartimages.com/asr/ad258f50-3af8-4ead-80c7-11933dd18b46_1.19d5c141b59b07ce7bd56fe4af994864.jpeg)

Speaking of cases, I looked at a bunch online and most of my gun cases are green, so I was trying to find something that matched those. The one that I ended up trying was NcStar CVG2907, which comes in green, and I got the longest one they had available which I think was 45” to make sure I had enough room for the gun with all the add-ons. I found it on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004QOBD1G) for $30 with free shipping and it has worked well for me so far, even with my stock always in the fully-extended position. There are five mag pockets on the exterior of the case, and I use a couple for mags but the rest for other gear, a couple basic tools, and my sling. No complaints here... it has worked well thus far, but it does show the dirt (if that matters to you) compared to maybe a black version.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61kZ-QwqhLL._SL1500_.jpg)

*** UPDATE - 08/09/2017 ***
I ended up buying a 10-round magazine for my rifle as well. I use a particular bench rest when shooting at the range (and at prairie dogs) and it's built for bolt-action guns, so there's not much clearance between the typical rifle stock and the bottom support of the rest. I can barely make it work with a typical 30-round clip, so I'm hoping the 10-rounder will be easier to manage on this rest. I found a Magpul 10-round magazine on Ebay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/1-MPI-Black-10-Round-ONLY-Magazine-5-56-223-10rd-Polymer-Enhanced-Mag-MVP/263106862665?ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT&_trksid=p2060353.m2749.l2649) for $16 with free shipping and it looks good and appears to function correctly in my rifle. I'll try it at the range and report back if I have any issues.

(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/o6cAAOSw5gFZd3vK/s-l1600.jpg)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:52:41 PM
I started to get nervous about the muzzle device - an A2 Flash Hider - that came on the gun. For me it became a risk of hearing loss for me and my hunting buddies, as we typically sit near each other when we're going after 'yotes. Since it doesn't impact accuracy and it's intended purpose is not aligned with mine, I decided to take it off. It took a pretty good pull with a wrench to break it loose, but then it unthreaded easily. To protect the threads on the barrel - I'm hoping to add a suppressor some day - I found a "thread protector" online that looks like the rest of the barrel. There are a bunch out there, but the one I liked had some light fluting, mainly for grip in my case, but the finish was the same as my DB15CCB. I found this one on Ebay (http://www.ebay.com/itm/151840662187?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT) for $8 and free shipping and it worked perfectly. The only issue for me is that there's a tiny gap between the barrel and the thread protector, but it's not enough to bother me. Some people will probably not like it, though :-)

(http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/~4AAAOSwIrNWFEts/s-l1600.jpg)
NOTE: This is a stock image and not my actual barrel; I guess it's easier to see the piece when the dark finish contrasts with a stainless barrel :main_blink:

Once I got the flash-hider off, I was surprised to see the end of the barrel looking really rough and ugly on the crown. I was shocked! Originally I thought it was shotty machining by Diamondback but then I read that it's likely carbon deposit trapped between the flash-hider and the barrel, so I calmed down. It took some serious rubbing to get that junk off, though, and I ended up having to use the pointy end of a cleaning rod tip (brass) to chisel the stuff off. After that I used some solvent and more elbow grease, and eventually it all came off and you could see that the machining was perfect. Based on my reading, this kind of deposit should build over many rounds fired, but I had only shot maybe 100 rounds, so I'm not sure if the factory shoots a ton of rounds through in their testing of each gun, or what. All worked out in the end, though, and the finished product looks very nice in my opinion. Now I'll be curious to see if there is any change in POI or accuracy in moving from the FH to the TP. There should not be, but only range-time will tell.

(http://gdurl.com/cLe8)

One side note from this exercise is that Diamondback appears to be using a 45-degree chamfer on these crowns, which I don't think I've ever seen before. I guess I'm used to seeing 11-degree crowns, or old rifles with round crowns, so this was a first for me. Not sure if this means anything one way or the other, but an observation nonetheless.

(http://gdurl.com/MWNP)

*** UPDATE - 03/01/2017 ***
I sent a note to Diamondback via their website's "Contact Us" page, asking how many rounds they fire through each rifle while testing them at the factory. I was curious, RE: the topic above about the carbon buildup on the crown of my new barrel. They replied right away, which is nice, and said that they typically only fire about 15 rounds during testing. So assuming that's the truth, 15 rounds is not a big deal after all. The carbon must just build up quickly, I guess!

*** UPDATE - 03/12/2017 ***
I noticed at the range today that my thread protector worked loose about one thread length over maybe 100 rounds fired. This had not happened before, so I just need to remember to check it during longer range sessions. I don't think it would impact accuracy at all if it comes loose this little bit, but it's not worth finding out, plus I don't want to lose it, so I'll be more diligent from now on.

*** UPDATE - 08/25/2017 ***
This happened a couple more times over the summer, so I decided to put a little teflon tape on the threads and then reinstall the thread protector. This appears to be working and, from everything that I've read, it won't hurt anything if the barrel heats up. I didn't have any Loc-tite, but this seems to be a cheaper alternative. I'll report back if the thread protector comes loose again; hopefully this will be the quick fix, though!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:53:08 PM
At this stage, I feel like I have a gun that is setup well for coyote hunting and that shoots pretty well at the range. In the future I'll tackle camo, suppressor (if IL changes their laws this year), and a few other mods, but for now, I like what I have and I'm probably into it for $600 plus $400 scope, so about $1,000 all in. Not too bad, really! So the next thing I wanted to work on - and am still working on - is ammo and finding the bullets that work best in the DB15CCB. Those original target rounds from Norma work fine but I wanted to figure out my go-to hunting loads. Since I was going on a trip to Florida after hogs this winter, I figured I would start with hog ammo. After some research, I narrowed down to two main loads that I wanted to try out: Remington's HogHammer (http://rd.bizrate.com/rd?t=http%3A%2F%2Fads.midwayusa.com%2Fproduct%2F494440%2Fremington-hog-hammer-ammunition-223-remington-62-grain-barnes-triple-shock-x-bullet-hollow-point-lead-free-box-of-20%3Fcm_mmc%3Dpf_ci_connexity-_-Ammunition%2B-%2BCenterfire%2BRifle%2B-%2BBig%2BGame-_-Remington-_-494440&mid=77064&cat_id=12150125&atom=10468&prod_id=&oid=6621765404&pos=1&b_id=18&bid_type=10&bamt=fd093910640770ad&cobrand=1&ppr=95a91775cc75641a&rf=af1&af_assettype_id=12&af_creative_id=2973&af_id=26865&af_placement_id=1659178&dv=ea5129453998692d64bccd7b7663f639&af_campaign_id=izfv7k6wt700zk8a03b2f) 62-grain copper round and Federal's Fusion MSR (http://rd.bizrate.com/rd?t=http%3A%2F%2Fads.midwayusa.com%2Fproduct%2F924416%2Ffederal-fusion-modern-sporting-rifle-ammunition-223-remington-62-grain-spitzer-boat-tail-box-of-20%3Fcm_mmc%3Dpf_ci_connexity-_-Ammunition%2B-%2BCenterfire%2BRifle%2B-%2BBig%2BGame-_-Federal%2BPremium-_-924416&mid=77064&cat_id=12150125&atom=10468&prod_id=&oid=6053069365&pos=1&b_id=18&bid_type=10&bamt=3eaa958df6a57e3c&cobrand=1&ppr=2325848384d19b31&rf=af1&af_assettype_id=12&af_creative_id=2973&af_id=26865&af_placement_id=1659178&dv=ea5129453998692d64bccd7b7663f639&af_campaign_id=izfv7k858q00zk8a03b2f) 62-grain soft point.

(https://www.federalpremium.com/images/products/brands/fusion/FU_MSR_F223MSR_223Rem_L.jpg)

(http://image.sportsmansguide.com/adimgs/l/2/283110_ts.jpg)

I was only shooting inside of 100 yards on that trip, so I left my zero at 100 yards from the 55-grain FMJ loads, and tried them both out. They both had minute-of-hog accuracy with 3-shot groups each, so I was happy enough with that for now. Then I put them to the test in the field and hit hogs with both. I always aim just below and behind the ear with hogs, and with both rounds, they would flatten 'em. I killed a 300+ pound pig with the HogHammer and it lunged forward and tipped over kicking. The Federals worked just as well and are a bit cheaper, so next time I'll probably just stick to those. Happy hunter all around, though :-)

(http://gdurl.com/nTcf)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:53:58 PM
Back on the topic of ammo, my main load for coyotes is a 50 or 55-grain VMAX bullet. I use handloads for my Remington bolt-action 223 rifle with great success, so I figured I would start there for my Diamondback. Unfortunately I ran into problems immediately at the range with the handloads. They just wouldn't seem to seat properly in the chamber and the bolt would close about 95% but not all the way. I made the mistake of trying the forward-assist to close the bolt all the way, but that may have just made things worse. No matter how hard I pulled back on the charging handle, the bolt would not release. To make matters worse, it was a live round and the gun would not switch to the "Safe" position. I ultimately had to drive home with the "loaded" gun for lack of options or tools, and then took it apart when I got home. I read online that this can happen and there were two solutions. First, I tried aiming the gun up and rest it on your shoulder, then pull down on the charging handle while tapping the butt of the gun on a table; that didn't work. Then I took the upper receiver off and wrapped the end of a screwdriver with a cloth, and pushed the front of the bolt backwards. It didn't take a ton of force and the bolt went back and the shell ejected. I'm not sure yet why it happened, but apparently it's not uncommon for handloads to do this. Something happens to the shoulder of the brass and it jams in the chamber and the bolt is far enough in to partially lock but not fully lock, and then you're in trouble. Every other round handled fine that day, just the handloads struggled, maybe 2 or 3 times out of 50 shots. It would be a bad day in the woods, though, if it happened on a hunt! So I'm sticking with factory ammo for now, but hope to get back to handloads sooner than later.

*** UPDATE - 02/28/2017 ***
From further inspection and research, the reused brass was previously shot in a Remington 700 rifle in 223 chamber. My best guess is that those brass slightly conformed to that 223 chamber over time and then were unable to fit properly in the 5.56/223 chamber on my DB15CCB. Since all factory loads work fine with new brass, I'll try reloading some new brass for the AR and hopefully that will prevent this issue from happening again.

*** UPDATE - 03/17/2017 ***
Just a quick update that, after another 200 or so rounds fired (all factory ammo), I have not had a single issue with cycling, firing, or ejecting. I haven't tried any of the really cheap steel stuff yet, but I will at some point. For now, though, it seems that the ol' DB15 will eat whatever I feed it, apart from those old reloaded brass.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:55:17 PM
With all of my prior posts being said, the two things that I'm working on now are: camo and ammo.

On the camo front, I've used Mossy Oak's vinyl gun wraps on a couple shotguns in the past and I love this stuff! It takes some patience to get it on right, but once it's on it looks great, feels great, and holds up to the toughest conditions. I've taken this stuff off guns after two years of being on, and it pulls right off without leaving a single trace of glue or gunk. They make a vinyl kit (http://www.mossyoakgraphics.com/ar-15-wrap-precut-universal-fit) for AR rifles and I'm going to pick one up - probably in Duck Blind pattern since I like that camo best for sitting on the ground - and see how it works. I'll keep you all posted on how it turns out!

(https://i.pinimg.com/736x/ac/8d/49/ac8d49cf12d81fa786235a34f809890e.jpg)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6m9HDxIH00w

*** UPDATE - 03/29/2017 ***
I finally made this purchase today. It was $46 with shipping directly from the Mossy Oak Graphics website, which is a little steep, but if it turns out as well as my other camo jobs using this product, it's worth it. I'll try to get it done sooner than later and will share photos of the final result.

*** UPDATE - 04/01/2017 ***
Well the camo job is now complete! It's a lot of work and almost like a jigsaw puzzle, only more difficult because the pieces don't all fit exactly right. The instructional video above was very helpful, especially the part about using a hair-drier to soften the material and help form it into place. I was super careful about not wasting any materials and was able to stretch the supply to my scope as well. The material is vinyl and it's a little slippery on the grip for my liking, so I put the camo gauze-wrap back on for some extra stickiness. I also had to cover my safe/fire markings so I added a small dot of red and white paint on both sides of the lower receiver, on top of the camo, in the appropriate spots for safety and fire positions. I actually think that looks kind of cool, even though I was disappointed to cover my earlier paint job [see reply #18]. My fingers are a bit raw and my X-Acto knife couldn't cut through butter... but it's done. Check out the photos I shared down on post #35 to see the final finals.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 01:56:58 PM
After using my mounted flashlight on a couple of night-hunts for coyotes, I started thinking about how to focus the beam a bit more. It's super bright and works great, but there's a lot of "light wash" where it lights up the whole woods instead of a specific area. My first attempt in adding a sort of flashlight tube was measuring the diameter of the lens, which is roughly 1.8". Then I picked up a 1 1/2" Schedule-40 PVC coupler at my local hardware store, which has an inside diameter around 1.9". I added a couple pieces of velcro tape (soft side) on the inside of the coupler and pressed it over the end of the flashlight. It works ok testing in the garage, but I'll take it on my next hunt, to see if it accomplishes its intended purpose. Here's what it looks like so far... field results pending!

(http://gdurl.com/ZFhK)

*** UPDATE - 03/08/2017 ***
The original coupling that I found was only maybe 2" from end to end, and it wasn't quite long enough to help focus the beam. Then I found another 1 1/2" coupling for $0.75 at Menards that was twice as long (~4"), so I painted it black - quick and dirty with some spray paint - and it worked like a charm. Here's the finished product; will report back after some additional field testing this weekend.

(http://gdurl.com/hz7M)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2017, 02:46:53 PM
I was getting tired of paying too much money for targets and decided to create my own, so I can print them any time I'm heading to the range. The first few are for printing on normal 8.5x11 paper, but if you have a bigger printer - maybe at the office :main_wink: - the last three are sized for 11x17 paper. The squares are 1" blocks and the circles are 1" increments as well. Here is a JPG of of an example of one of the targets, but download the PDF files to print in the best resolution.

(http://gdurl.com/M-kx)

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Feel free to use and share!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 26, 2017, 08:12:46 PM
I was a little disappointed when I got my DB15CCB that the safety selector markings on the lower receiver were just rolled or stamped, with no color in the lettering. If you've had a dozen years of AR experience or never let rookies shoot with you, that might be fine, but neither is true for me. It can be hard to read the letters in a hurry, so I prefer the red and white colored letters to make things faster and easier, particularly in getting from "fire" to "safe". There a hundred videos on YouTube for filling in the roll marks with Testors model paint. I picked up a tiny bottle of white and red paint online for a couple bucks. Then I cleaned the surface with some rubbing alcohol so the paint would stick. After that, I used toothpicks to take a tiny bit of paint and apply it in each letter depression, being super careful not to overfill the marks. Even a toothpick is a little too thick for this task, so maybe a needle or safety-pin would work better. Either way, if you're careful in your application, once the paint dries, you're done. If you got a little sloppy, then you can use alcohol or nail-polish remover to clean off the excess paint on the receiver. Some videos suggest covering the whole area liberally and then cleaning up after, but the one area I had to clean up was a pain, so do your best to avoid that step if possible. This photo isn't my rifle, but it illustrates the outcome. You can get crazy filling in the other depressions, like logos and gun info, but I opted to just fill the "safe" and "fire" marks on mine. Costs about $5 and took me about 20 minutes in total, so pretty easy and cheap upgrade, since Diamondback stopped filling these at the factor (they did in earlier DB15 models I've seen).

(http://scontent.cdninstagram.com/t51.2885-15/s750x750/sh0.08/e35/12751106_792788554160406_135728752_n.jpg)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 27, 2017, 11:18:55 AM
I've been saying since day-1 that the trigger is on my list of things to do for the DB15CCB - and I'm not the only one (https://www.gunsamerica.com/blog/diamondback-db-15-b-semicustom-entry-level-prices-gun-review/) - but I was deploying cash towards some other upgrades first. I just didn't have the bandwidth to drop $200+ on a nice drop-in trigger system, but some folks on this forum (http://www.diamondbackforum.com/index.php?topic=1137.0) pointed to a possible interim solution to reduce the trigger pull - JP Enterprises' Reduced Power Trigger Spring Kit. The JP website say that if you're already using JP parts in your trigger, these replacement trigger springs can get you down to 3.5# pull, but if not you can still get to 4.5#. I don't have a trigger scale, unfortunately, but based on some quick research it sounds like it's advertised as a 7.0# single-stage and actual results are in the 7.0# - 7.5# range. That's pretty high but not all that uncommon for factory triggers, especially on a budget gun. If I can spend $15-ish and knock that pull down by 30-40% with a 10-minute adjustment, then I'm definitely up for giving that a try.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51qyDp1uQLL._SX425_.jpg)

***UPDATE - 02/28/2017***
I just ordered the kit for $11 + $7 shipping from Optics Planet (http://www.opticsplanet.com/jp-enterprises-reduced-power-trigger-spring-kit-for-ar-15.html), and will try to get it installed this coming weekend. I'll report back once it's in and we'll see if this truly is the "poor man's trigger job". I know a few others on here also suggested polishing and a few other tweaks to improve the trigger, but we'll start with the springs and see how that goes. More to come, soon!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1UAvVQ32os

***UPDATE - 03/05/2017***
I received my new springs and, as promised, it took about 10 minutes to switch out the hammer spring. I only changed that spring, as from what I read, that has the most impact and is the easiest to do. I had a little trouble getting the the hammer pin back through the receiver, but with some wiggling and a little pressure, it went. I tested the trigger a bunch of times to make sure I hadn't done anything stupid, and it worked flawlessly. Then I took the gun out to the range and I can't tell you how big of a difference it made :main_thumbs_2up: The trigger is so much smoother and, while I don't have a trigger scale, it felt to me like a 40-50% reduction in pull weight. I didn't see any issues, as I was nervous about light primer strikes. Apparently this is more of an issue on foreign ammo, which I've read uses a harder primer. I need to go back in and grease the trigger surface a bit, but to me, this is a no-brainer upgrade for $15 on the DB15CCB.

***UPDATE - 03/14/2017***
After I installed the hammer spring from this kit, I ended up posting the remaining two spring in the kit on Ebay. They sold last night for $9 and I'm going to sell the stock hammer spring, also, maybe getting a couple bucks for that. So net-net, I got my new and improved hammer spring for about $5. Love the power of Ebay!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on March 06, 2017, 11:29:12 AM
I took my gun out to the range over the weekend and figured I would snag a new pic to share, in case you're curious how everything I've explained on this thread has turned out so far.

(http://gdurl.com/qBXA)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on March 06, 2017, 12:08:24 PM
I finally had a chance to pickup some different coyote ammo for a range test, to figure out which stuff had the best groupings in my DB15CCB. It was a little windy, but the results are all same gun / same shooter / same bench / etc.  I was also careful to wait for lulls in the breeze to minimize any affect on the bullets. Plus, I only shot out to 100 yards on this trip, so windage should be nominal. I'll have to test at 200-400 yards when it's a bit calmer out, but some preliminary results so far.

Here's the ammo that I took out:

(http://gdurl.com/Rkf6)

I started at 50 yards and used the FMJs to add a little copper in the ol' barrel and warm 'er up for the real stuff. Here are the results - please forgive the crappy photos; I'll try to get something better to replace these later this week.

NormaUSA TAC-223 FMJ, 55 grains @ 50 yards
(http://gdurl.com/HZDQ)
3 shots = 1.5" group

Federal V-Shok 223, 40 grains @ 50 yards
(http://gdurl.com/EJGI)
3 shots = 1.6" group

Remington AccuTip 223, 50 grains @ 50 yards
(http://gdurl.com/nEsd)
3 shots = 0.8" group

Winchester Varmint-X 223, 55 grains @ 50 yards
(http://gdurl.com/Tc-b)
3 shots = 0.7" group

Federal Fusion 223 MSR, 62 grains @ 50 yards
(http://gdurl.com/kpO3)
3 shots = 1.9" group

Then I moved back to 100 yards and repeated the process. I did not use the FMJs at this range; those were just to foul the barrel a touch before the actual testing began.

Federal V-Shok 223, 40 grains @ 100 yards
(http://gdurl.com/Cldn)
3 shots = 2.2" group [wind might have blow that flier off track]

Remington AccuTip 223, 50 grains @ 100 yards
(http://gdurl.com/7qV1)
3 shots = 1.0" group

Winchester Varmint-X 223, 55 grains @ 100 yards
(http://gdurl.com/v9zL)
3 shots = 0.2" group

Federal Fusion 223 MSR, 62 grains @ 100 yards
(http://gdurl.com/L2wG)
3 shots = 3.3" group

After shooting these particular rounds, I think I'll be using the Winchester Varmint-X (http://www.winchester.com/products/rifle-ammunition/performance/varmint-x/Pages/default.aspx) 223 ammo in 55 grains for coyotes :main_grin: The Remington AccuTip 50-grains performed really well, too, but they are a lot more expensive around here, so the Winchesters are my winning ticket, at least for now. I will test at 200, 300, and 400 on a calmer day, adjust my scope down a bit, and also see which ammo "matches" best with the Nikoplex system on my scope at those longer ranges. That said, I am super impressed with the DB15CCB's precision so far. And I should mention, not a single issue during this day of testing; every round from these manufacturers shot and cycled without any hiccups. More to come, as soon as this darn wind dies down!

*** UPDATE - 03/11/2017 ***
I was back out at the range today and added two new coyote rounds to the mix: Remington's AccuTip-V in 55 grains and Winchester's Ballistic SilverTip also in 55 grains. I also wanted to retry the two best loads from last time to make sure their success wasn't a fluke: Winchester's Varmint-X in 55 grains and Remington's AccuTip-V in 50 grains. I had previously zeroed the scope at 100 yards with the Winchester Varmint-X 55 grain ammo. Here are the results...

Winchester Ballistic SilverTip 223, 55 grains @ 100 yards
(http://gdurl.com/E2kp)
3 shots = 1.6" group
Velocity = 3002, 2986, 2956 FPS (rated 3240)
Price = $28 / 20

Winchester Varmint-X 223, 55 grains @ 100 yards
(http://gdurl.com/CmPe)
2 shots = 0.5" group
Velocity = 2846, 2950 FPS (rated 3240)
Price = $21 / 20

Remington AccuTip-V 223, 50 & 55 grains @ 100 yards
(http://gdurl.com/Pcxl)
2 shots each = 0.3" group each (the pairs are vertical to each other)
Velocity, 50g = 3001, 2863, 3070 (rated 3410)
Price = $31 / 20

So in today's testing, the new entry - Winchester SilverTip - did not hold up to the competition. Once again, the ol' Winchester Varmint-X and Remington AccutTip (both weights) did very well. It's amazing how the 50 and 55 grain Remington's shot the same exact group but the 55 grain version was just a hair off center. It was also interesting to see that the velocities were all pretty close, at about 400 FPS slower than rated (thanks to my 16" barrel), although I will admit that the SilverTip results were more consistent than the others. You would think that would correlate to better groups on the paper, but that's not the case here. Anyways, for the money, the Varmint-X will remain my go to loads for coyote hunting. Tomorrow looks to be the best wind day here, so if I'm lucky, I'll be able to go out again and try at 200 and 300 yards. I'll post those results as soon as they're in.

*** UPDATE - 03/13/2017 ***
Another day at the range, this time with very low winds, so I was excited to get some long-range results. In the testing today, the 200-yard results were not surprising and their groups were representative of the 100-yard results seen before. Then I moved back to 300 yards and things got a little more interesting. Instead of posting a ton of targets, I've marked digital targets below showing the impacts. I was running a little low on some ammo, so I only shot two of each at this range, but I did have extra of both Winchesters, so there are extra holes there for good measure.

(http://gdurl.com/3PJYJ)

As you can see, the Varmint-X and Remington's continued to show good groupings. Note that one shot on target #2 caught a wind gust that came out of nowhere, but the vertical hits are about on the same plane. From an elevation standpoint, I would take any of targets 1, 2, and 3, which is again consistent with what I've seen previously from these loads. I was surprised at the 40-grain results on target #6, though, as those Federal V-Shok loads had been a bit erratic at closer ranges; maybe just luck on this one. This concludes my ammo testing for now, as those rounds aren't cheap! My lesson learned here is that, as you can see above, the Winchester Varmint-X (55gr) and Remington AccuTip-V (50gr & 55gr) seem to perform very well from my DB15CCB. I'll post a separate message with all the data I collected on the loads tested, in case that's helpful and hopefully saves others from spending as much money testing ammo as I did :main_idiot2_ncc:

*** UPDATE - 04/17/2017 ***
I found a new contender in the ammo battle - Federal's American Eagle AR223 Tipped Varmint. It's a 223 round in 50-grains with ballistic tip and boat-tail design. Lots of positive reviews online and an incredible price-point, but you can check out my results down in post #25 below.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: Chris on March 06, 2017, 04:27:48 PM
That Winchester Varmint-X 223, 55 grain grouping is amazing.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on March 10, 2017, 11:53:49 PM
I have been considering a switch of the stock charging handle that came with my DB15CCB. The original seemed fine, but it felt like it took more effort than it should to operate. I learned that you can either replace the entire charging handle assembly ($30-100) or switch out just the latch ($5-25). We started another thread (http://www.diamondbackforum.com/index.php?topic=4192.0) on this topic, which shows a few suggestions for replacement parts and assemblies. @SavsPaw suggested the BCM Mod4 Medium, which runs about $50 and looks pretty sweet.

(https://4b1e874935ea5d25a97e-f099844d0e354c7ab50c55a966be6870.ssl.cf2.rackcdn.com/product/XBCMGFH4.jpg)

While debating this modification, I had my rifle apart and it seemed like the track (sorry, probably not the correct term) where my charging handle rides was really dry and didn't have any grease. I applied some grease in the track and a little lube on the latch, and now it seems to work much more easily and a whole lot smoother. I'm not sure if Diamondback sends these out "dry" on purpose or not, but for now I'll take $0.25 worth of grease over a larger investment on a new charging handle until I'm convinced that I need one :main_lipsrsealed_ncc:

*** UPDATE - 03/22/2017 ***
If you read our other post (http://www.diamondbackforum.com/index.php?topic=4192.0) on this topic, you'll see that @SavsPaw made the replacement on his charging handle and he said it was the best upgrade he's made thus far. That definitely makes it more interesting!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on March 13, 2017, 01:44:55 PM
Now that I have my coyote ammo pretty well picked out (see above post), it's time to figure out which of the winning loads matches closest to the Nikoplex turrets setup on my Nikon 4-16x M223 scope. I collected a bunch of data over the last few range trips to try to turn "art" into "science" a bit, and here are those results:

(http://gdurl.com/I5j7)

For each ammo tested, you'll see some info on the projectile itself, mostly found online. Then in the velocities section, the blue numbers are averages of the results collected using a chronograph. The top line values in black came from Nikon's SpotOn software available for free online, showing "as advertised" muzzle and down-range velocities, energies, and points of impacts. The second line takes the measured velocities and then inputs them into SpotOn to correlate down-range velocities, energies, and points of impact. Next to the blue numbers you'll see the difference between advertised and actual velocities, as well as the standard deviation in my results, as a measure of consistency from each manufacturer. From there, in the "Path" section, the blue numbers were actual results and the black numbers are from SpotOn. These results are with my scope set to it's zero, which is the '100' mark on the top turret, so you can see the drop. I used the Varmint-X loads as the true zero, so some are consistently lower, but that could be corrected if a different load were ultimately selected. After 200 yards the impacts are off the paper, so they are marked "n/a". The next section is where I adjusted the Nikoplex setting on my scope to the actual distances. So at 100 yards it's set to '100', at 200 yards it's set to '200', and so on. So far I've completed testing for all loads out to and including 300 yards, as I shared in that earlier post. This is just looking at elevation, so windage was not penalized in these conditions.

The ammo was broken into three sections based on their group size at 100 yards: 1 MOA = green, 2 MOA = orange, 3+ MOA = red. So while the Varmint-X shot the best groupings at 100 and 200 yards, the Remignton loads were not too far behind in their performance. Then, when matching up with the Nikoplex settings, it appears that my best bet is to use the Remington AccuTip-V (https://www.remington.com/ammunition/centerfire-rifle/premier-accutip-v) ammo in 50-grain (preferred) or 55-grain varieties. The Winchester ammo really dropped off at that range, which was disappointing, because it shot so well out to 200 yards. I was so surprised that I tested it again, but the results looked very similar the second time around. When thinking about it later, it does make sense, and I actually mentioned above in a previous post that I was expecting this since Nikon sets their Nikoplex up for ammo shooing 3240 FPS, but my 16" barrel was going to mean (and ultimately showed) slowed velocities and therefore lower points of impact.

Now that I've really narrowed my list down (and burned up the other stuff!), I can try again at 400-600 yards. I'm not saying that I would take a shot at a coyote with a 223 at that range, but it will be interesting to see how the Nikoplex does that far out. I'll post an update here once I get a super-calm day to give it a shot!

*** UPDATE - 03/14/2017 ***
After doing some more digging, it turns out that the Varmint-X (55gr) and AccuTip (55gr) are both flat base bullets, not boat tail as I had them marked in my spreadsheet. The AccuTip (50gr) is, in fact, a boat tail design; not sure why they did not do the same for the 55gr variety, but something to note in the bullet comparisons.

*** UPDATE - 03/16/2017 ***
I reached out to Remington's tech service group via their website and received notice back that, as I mentioned in my last post, their AccuTip-V 223 rounds are boat-tail for 50-grain and flat base for 55-grain. Apparently they're having issues where certain sellers are advertising the 55-grain versions as boat-tail, which is not true. They said their packaging reads correctly, though, so I guess I should have noticed that myself. Anyways, perhaps this is part of the reason the 50-grain is doing better at longer ranges? The boat-tail design shouldn't really matter within 200 yards - actually, flat base should be better at those ranges - but the boat-tail should make a difference at 300+ yards. Food for thought!

(http://gdurl.com/W69v)

*** UPDATE - 04/17/2017 ***
I finally had a chance to try out the Federal American Eagle AR223 Tipped Varmint ammo I picked up a couple weeks back. Everything I've read suggests that this stuff is the cat's meow... shoots great, clean, accurate, etc etc. I picked up a few boxes when Federal had a rebate, but even without that it's only about $10-12 per box, which is cheap! Plus it's a 50-grain V-Max with a boat-tail, which is exactly what I was looking for to match my Nikoplex scope system, so I had to give it a shot.

(https://media.midwayusa.com/productimages/880x660/Primary/866/866317.jpg)

The bad news was that A) despite the weatherman promising me no winds, it was blowing about 10mph quartering from behind and right-to-left, and B) my trigger wasn't in great shape despite my best efforts shared in post #35 below. Regardless, the results are pretty darn good with sub-MOA accuracy and good groups out to 200 yards. The groups opened up a bit at 300 yards but any of them would have still resulted in a dead coyote. The good news is that the ammo matched nicely to my Nikoplex system, hitting right on at 100, an inch or two high at 200, and generally a shade high at 300. I don't think I'll move the zero as I like these impact points, which you can see below:

(http://gdurl.com/2M0h)

I blame my current trigger woes for the groups not having been tighter and the wind was definitely pushing my hits left out at 300 yards, but still not too bad for shooting "cheap ammo" out of a "budget AR" if you ask me :main_winkani_ncc: I'll get back on a truly calm day to try again and hopefully I'll have the trigger situated by then. I want to try 400 yards next time as well, to see if the Nikoplex holds at that range with this ammo. In the meantime, I'm going to put this rig to the test over the upcoming weekend against some coy-dogs. I'll report back if I have any... data.

*** UPDATE - 08/25/2017 ***
I finally had a nice evening to shoot at 400 yards with my finished setup. I had no winds and a stable rest and turned my Nikoplex setting to 400. With three shots fired I had the first hit center L/R but about 4" high, the second was perfect up/down but 4" left, and the third was low/left about 5". I was shooting the American Eagle Tipped Varmint 50-grain boat-tails, which has become my ammo of choice for this gun. It seems that this rifle/ammo match does excellent out to 300 and is still pretty good at 400 yards. I would feel confident taking a shot at a coyote at 400 but probably no further, which is reasonable for a fairly light bullet in factory 223 loads. Most of my hunting shots are well within that marker anyways, so I'll call this good!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on April 01, 2017, 05:34:00 PM
I was able to complete my camo job today using the Mossy Oak skin noted back in post #15. It is tedious work and a few hours working carefully with an X-Acto knife, but the end results looks really good! I took the flashlight off for these shots, but other than that, I now consider this rifle 100% complete. I need to test one more type of ammo, and I'll have my final range reports coming up soon, but other than that I think she's all set :main_megacool_ncc:

(http://gdurl.com/JDEX)

(http://gdurl.com/VH9r)

As you may (or may not) remember, I was trying to put together a cost-effective coyote and hog gun when I first started this tread a million posts ago. Now that I feel I'm there, here's a quick recap of the costs:

Rifle & Accessories
$510 - Diamondback DB15CCB;
$038 - WindFire Green Flashlight;
$013 - WindFire Red LED Bulb;
$009 - Offset Mount;
$020 - Shotgun Fiberoptic Bead;
$008 - Curved Trigger Guard;
$001 - Rubber O Ring;
$006 - Rail Ladder Covers (x2);
$020 - Single Point Sling;
$012 - Receiver End Plate with Sling Adapter;
$008 - Thread Protector;
$046 - Mossy Oak Camo Skin;
$001 - Flashlight Tube Extension;
$018 - JP Trigger Spring;
$010 - Sold extra JP Trigger Springs on Ebay;
$008 - Sold original A2 Flash-hider on Ebay;
$004 - Sold original Trigger Guard on Ebay;
$001 - Sold original Receiver End Plate on Ebay
$687

Optics
$450 - Nikon M223 4-16x Nikoplex;
$025 - TMS Scope Mount;
$000 - SunGuard KillFlash ARD;
$001 - Sold Nikon Scope Caps on Ebay
$474

Other
$030 - Rifle Case;
$025 - Magpul Magazine
$055

That brings us to a net total cost of $687 for the rifle and accessories plus $474 in optics and a grand total of $1,161 all-in with a nice scope included. I think that's pretty darn amazing for a gun that looks good, works great, and shoots very well. I'm confident in my ability to kill hogs (proven!) and I would take a shot at a coyote at least to 300 yards; maybe 400 yards with one more range trip and ammo test.

I couldn't be happier with my original purchase of this rifle and would vouch for the DB15CCB for anybody reading this who's considering picking one up. As Nike likes to say... Just Do It!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: Turtle2113 on April 15, 2017, 06:34:40 AM
Wow! I love this thread! Very well put together, informative, and detailed man. I'm also a first time AR owner, (have only owned my weapon for maybe over a month) went to my local gun store planning on buying the BushMaster Minimalist SD & while waiting for service saw my DB15EFDE on the rack and fell in love. I have however had some complications with it but feel it was mostly operator error, terrible ammo & inexperience (this is my first brand new weapon). I have to say I have learned a lot from this post & hope you continue with it as I have thoroughly enjoyed reading it tonight. Have you ran into any issues with your weapon? I.E. malfunctions, jams, double feeds, not firing, issues with cheap ammo such as tul? Thanks so much in advance!


P.S. If you have Facebook, I am in some great Ar groups that have been extremely helpful.
AR 15 SNOB FREE
Ar 15 Nation
AR 15 Safe Space

Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on April 16, 2017, 07:17:06 PM
Today I decided I would do a little work on my DB15CCB trigger. In post #19 you can read about my trigger spring replacement, which worked great, but I thought I might be able to get some added benefit from sear surface polishing and lubrication. I took the trigger apart and inspected the two sear surfaces. I had my Dremel tool ready to go, but I found surfaces that already looked very clean and were polished shiny and smooth. It looked good enough that I decided not to mess with it, while my mind played the saying, "If it ain't broke..."

Next, I thought I'd add a little lube to the sear surfaces to help make a smooth pull. I had some grease laying around that I figured would do the trick, so I applied a little on both surfaces and then reassembled the trigger into the lower received. I cycled the trigger a few times to spread the grease but noticed that the more I cycled the trigger the more it started to get "sticky" and uneven. I panicked and grabbed some WD40 hoping that would spray the grease off and restore order on the sear. It only made things worse...

After messing up - that's how we all learned, right? - I did the research online that I should have done before starting this endeavor. I found that a lot of folks like to use Ronsonol lighter fluid (https://www.walgreens.com/store/c/ronsonol-lighter-fluid/ID=prod6021241-product) to clean and degrease their trigger assemblies on a regular basis. According to a few threads (https://www.thehighroad.org/index.php?threads/ronsonol-lighter-fluid-as-a-degreaser.652227/), the recommendation was to use a few drops of lighter fluid to degrease the sear surface as part of regular cleaning, and then hit it with a good dousing after heavy use or if dirt/dust gets into the assembly somehow.

Knowing that I had bad grease and WD40 in the trigger, I decided to pick up some Ronsonol fluid for $5 at Walgreens, and give it a good dousing. I used a toothpick to scrape away the excess grease, but you could see the lighter fluid doing its job right away. The lighter fluid evaporates pretty quick and everything looked dry after maybe ten minutes. I tried cycling the trigger again and couldn't believe how much better it was; back to original status. I never would have guessed that this trick could solve my problem, but I'm sure glad it did :main_embaressed:

In the end, I should have just left well enough alone. My lessons learned were that A) my DB15CCB didn't need any extra polishing on the sear surfaces, and B) my attempt to lubricate the sear surfaces failed and I had to hustle to back that out. The silver lining, if any, is that I found the lighter fluid trick and proved that it worked (for me), so from now on I'll use the lighter fluid as part of my cleaning regimen.

*** UPDATE - 04/17/2017 ***
I had my rifle at the range today. Sadly my trigger fix didn't last long and the trigger started to become really sticky and uneven again. Ugh... It was hurting accuracy big time and super frustrating. I need to get this sorted out ASAP.

*** UPDATE - 08/02/2017 ***
I'm back! Sorry about the hiatus, folks. After lots of reading and talking with experienced black-gun folks, I'm ready to take another stab at fixing my trigger issues. First, I just ordered a small tube of Flitz Metal Polish for $6 on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000MUSOW4). Apparently you use a q-tip and some polish and just rub the sear surfaces until you get them good and smooth.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51YfTDw6eML.jpg)

Then you use the lighter fluid (see above) to clean away any residue from the polish. Once the surfaces are smooth and clean, then you apply a bit of Mobilgrease 28 to lube the contact areas; I found a pre-packed syringe of the stuff for $9 on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00XIQHOAW). Both of these items should be delivered in the next two days, so I'll give it a shot and let you all know how it turns out.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/81yCTb2M%2B-L._SL1500_.jpg)

*** UPDATE - 08/12/2017 ***
Well I received my Flitz the other day and set to work with a Q-tip (several of them) in polishing the sear surfaces of my trigger. I do think that it help a lot, and the finished surfaces are more mirror-like now than they were before. I was also able to remove the majority of the bad grease from before, so that's a good thing. I decided to not use the lighter fluid at the end and just used a paper towel to make sure I had all the polish off. After that I put a small dab of the Mobilgrease 28 on the sear surfaces and also a dab on the trigger springs. Once I put it all back together, it seems to be a lot smoother and more like how it was when I purchased the rifle... before I tried to get fancy and messed it up :main_unsure:
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: SavsPaw on April 16, 2017, 08:47:11 PM
I have a feeling somebody is going to upgrade their trigger. Two stage? Hmmmm?
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: Chris on April 16, 2017, 09:19:10 PM
Dang, SuperB, I singed my eyebrows using the lighter fluid trick!  :main_lol:
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on April 17, 2017, 01:40:25 PM
@Chris - Haha! The thought definitely crossed my mind while dousing my rifle with lighter fluid that I should be careful about it catching any heat or random rays of sun :-) My girlfriend absolutely thought I was nuts.

@SavsPaw - I love the idea of upgrading my trigger, but I'm having a hard time justifying the cost on this, my "budget" rifle. To spend $200 on an upgrade for a $600 gun seems extreme. Don't get me wrong, though... on my long-range prairie dog gun the trigger job was worth every penny! If I could find a good trigger for $100ish, I might take a closer look.

@Turtle2113 - I'm glad you like this thread and got some benefit from it! Thanks for the suggestions on those Facebook pages, too; I signed up for a couple of them. As for issues with the DB15CCB, apart from that one issue I had with reloaded brass, I haven't had a single issue with my rifle. That said, I have not tried any foreign or steel ammo, but I know others have had good luck using it with their DBs.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on August 03, 2017, 07:03:53 PM
I recently had somebody ask me about how I clean my DB15CCB. It was an interesting question. I thought to myself, "I clean it like I clean all of my high-performance rifles." Then again, this is my first AR-style rifle, so maybe that's not the best approach. Hmm....

I know some folks buy an AR for its durability and to "ride it hard and put it away wet", as they say. I also know there's a pretty typical routine that many folks follow about overall maintenance of these weapons, which I believe stems from the military manuals, and I think those are great. The part that I wanted to highlight today relates to just the business end of these rifles - the barrel.

Ever since I have owned long-range rifles and spent summers poppin' prairie dogs on the plains, I've always followed a fairly specific cleaning regimen for the barrels. This comes mostly from my dad, who instilled this in me, to ensure that our guns not only lasted a long time and looked good, but so they shot good for the life of the barrel. For prairie dogs, we would shoot up to 20 rounds per sitting, checking the barrel temp every couple rounds to make sure it wasn't overheating - it you can't touch it, let it rest. At the end of a sit, we would take that gun to a cleaning bench. First, we'd send one or two "wet" patches down the barrel, soaked with Butch's Bore Shine (https://www.midwayusa.com/product/1982324820/butchs-bore-shine-bore-cleaning-solvent), to loosen things up. After it sat for about 30 seconds, we'd start sending dry patches down, one after the other. To conserve patches, we'd send a patch down, turn that one inside-out, and then send it down again. This would continue until the patches came out clean or mostly clean. Then, at the end of each day, we would wet the barrel, use a brush to scrub it out, hit it with another wet patch, and then send dry patches until they showed up clean on the other end.

(https://media.midwayusa.com/productimages/2200x1650/Primary/381/381808.jpg)

And that's it! I know this is super obvious to most shooters, but I thought it might be helpful to any folks who are new to shooting. Does everybody agree with this approach, generally speaking? Again, I'm just focused on the barrel for right now, since this whole thread is geared for "cheap accuracy and reliability."

My dad and I just retired a Remington 700 VSSF 22-250 barrel that fired more rounds over the last 15 years than I can honestly count, and it was a tack driver all the way to the end. I'm hoping that I'll be able to say the same for my DB15CCB in the years to come, if I take good care of 'er :main_azn:
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on August 07, 2017, 04:20:55 PM
I was out at the range shooting pistols last weekend, but couldn't help myself, and threw the DB15CCB in the truck as well. Here's a fun slow-motion clip of a V-max 223 bullet from my DB connecting with a plastic ketchup bottle filled with H2O at about 25 yards :main_thumbs_2up:

video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RUbsAL7LhLo)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: Chris on August 08, 2017, 01:36:44 PM
Shooting is way more fun when things explode! Well, all except for the gun, that is...  :main_thumbs_2up:
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on August 13, 2017, 01:54:28 PM
Funny turn of events here:

I just finished cleaning up and polishing my sear surfaces (see reply #27) and was planning on installing one of those trigger adjustment screws (http://www.diamondbackforum.com/index.php?topic=4256.0) to remove the take-up in my mil-spec trigger. Then, as luck would have it, my dad won a Timney 3-lb drop-in trigger in a raffle last night. Since he doesn't own an AR, I was the fortunate recipient of this prize (https://www.timneytriggers.com/shop/timney-ar-15-competition-replacement-trigger.aspx) :main_grin:

(https://cdn8.bigcommerce.com/s-45f4e81vr4/images/stencil/1024x1024/products/1830/504/667S_Front__03561.1531141702.png?c=2)

As I've mentioned before, I had not planned on spending $200+ on a drop-in trigger and felt like I could get 80% of the way there with a few of the cheaper fixes mentioned throughout this thread. But hey... if you get a free Timney... you have to go with it! I installed it with the excitement of a kid on Christmas Eve and it feels amazing. I can't wait to get out to the range and try it for real.

*** UPDATE - 08/18/2017 ***
Wow - this trigger is amazing! That pretty much sums it up. I still don't know if I would have paid $225 for it, at least not for this rifle, but it is pretty sweet. That said, I was looking forward to testing out the trigger adjustment screw; they seem really slick and I bet they'd work wonders on the basic trigger since the take-up is so long. If anybody tries one of those screws out, please let me know how it works.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: Chris on August 13, 2017, 04:10:28 PM
That's just awesome! Dad's can be so great, especially when they win stuff they don't need! LOL. You'll be way better of with the Timney that the adjustment screw which simply reduces travel to break, or sear/hook overlap. Also reduces safety to break unless you're sure the sear/hook angles are correct for the shorter travel distance. I have a Wilson Combat single stage TTU, and, like the Timney and some others, triggers these days can't get any better. It's a great time to be a shooter.  :main_smiley: 
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on August 19, 2017, 12:38:36 AM
Well, after having a rough day at the range recently, I wanted to go out tonight just before dark to verify that everything was working right. Although it's a short shooting window, I love the last hour before dark because there's usually no wind, and that was exactly the case tonight. I had cleaned my barrel well after the last outing because it was shooting all over the paper, which is not typical. Tonight though, the results were more as I've come to expect from my DB15CCB shooting American Eagle Tipped Varmint 223 50-grain at 100 yards.

(http://gdurl.com/K7yR)

I thought this was interesting to share because you can see that my first shot was 2.5" high but dead-on left/right. Then my second and third shots were... as the monkey that went pee in the cash register... right on the money. I wonder if the first shot is due to A) cold bore, B) clean bore, or C) all of the above? I'll try to isolate that sometime and see if I can figure it out for sure.

So that got me thinking - what changed from the last time I shot (terrible groups at all distances) to today (almost touching)? Here's the list that I came up with off the top of my head, but it's all speculation since I didn't do any sort of process of elimination to figure it out. Interesting list to consider, though:
If I can narrow this list down, I will let y'all know! In the name of science, of course :main_winkani_ncc:

*** UPDATE - 08/22/2017 ***
I was doing a little research on this issue and came across a research report from the US Air Force Academy (http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a568594.pdf) on the affect of coated bullets on accuracy. Based on the report, the summary is "The different coating and bullet combinations produced changes in friction ranging from reductions in friction of 15% to increases in friction of 19%. Given the time and expense of coating bullets, the reduction in friction is not cost effective for most applications." If the Lubalox coating is creating varying levels of friction = velocities = POI, then it is at least plausible that shooting those Winchester bullets during my previous range trip could have caused my accuracy issues. Then, after cleaning the barrel, this issue would have been removed and accuracy restored, as was seen on my more recent range visit. Anyways, no math behind this, but an interesting theory nonetheless.

*** UPDATE - 08/25/2017 ***
I had another beautiful, calm night at the range for some shooting. I only used AE Tipped Varmint ammo this time around and my DB15CCB shot great, even out at 300-400 yards. There was no wind and the was about 70F, so I think I can safely narrow my issues list down to 1) Lubalox coating from Winchester ammo, or 2) something with feeding from a magazine versus putting one round at a time into the chamber. I'm out of those Lubalox bullets, so next time I'll try shooting specifically from the magazine and make sure it works as it should. Today I fed one round at a time, so I wasn't able to eliminate that variable yet. More to come next time!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on March 08, 2018, 03:12:38 PM
Over the last few range sessions, I've been trying to figure out the most efficient and stable way to shoot at longer distances. I have a nice metal, swiveling table that my dad and I fabricated a long time ago, and that has always been our go-to for the range (and prairie dogs!) but it felt like it was starting to get a little unstable. You'd never notice it within 200 yards, but when you get to 400 yards, any movement seems like an earthquake through the 16x scope. Through some trial and error, we found the back of my dad's pickup truck to be the exact right height and - if it's not windy - the bed provides a stable spot to shoot from the prone position. We rolled out an old yoga mat that I found in my closet (not mine, I swear) and it's much more comfortable than I would have guessed. Anyways, from there the next question was around the front support of the rifle. We have a really nice rest that we use for prairie doggin' but the AR-style rifle doesn't fit well into it. Sandbags and shot bags are fine, but they can be a pain to move around. I decided that a bipod might do the trick, so I ordered a relatively inexpensive one from Amazon (http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01E4YVCOA/) for $19 delivered. There were almost 2500 reviews and the product carried a 4.5-star rating, so I figured it would be at least decent.

(https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/71XpawIMkML._SL1500_.jpg)

The bipod comes with a picattiny adapter, which looks like a normal sling post, and the bipod then clamps onto that. It was super easy to mount up and looks solid. You can release the legs and they pop out, but then you can adjust them anywhere from 6-9" depending on the rifle, the shooter, and the range. Everything worked as it was supposed to and I had good luck with it when I tested it at the range last weekend. I'm not sure if it'll replace my shooting sticks for hunting purposes, but for the range, it might just be the winner.

One last, fun note on using the truck bed for shooting prone. The range at our hunt club is basically a long, flat road between a fence and a sunflower field, with a big dirt burm and a backstop at one end. We have the distances marked every 100 yards and you can drive the truck out and back along the dirt road. It was awesome because I could shoot three shots, stay in prone, my dad drove to the next stake, pop off three more, and so on from distances of 100 to 600 yards. I haven't pushed past 400 yards with this rifle yet, but maybe some day :-)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on July 16, 2018, 02:12:50 PM
It was a beautiful day on Sunday, so I decided to break out the DB15CCB and see how she's shooting, after spending a few months in the case.

(http://gdurl.com/SlQW)

I started at 100 yards and put the first two shots in the same hole. Then I went back to 200 yards and had about a 2" group in moderate winds. So I'd say she's still good to go :main_megacool_ncc: These groups were shot with the American Eagle Tipped Varmint ammo, as I reviewed in an earlier thread. I still want to do a head-to-head contest between the budget AE ammo and Remington's much more expensive AccuTip ammo, so stay tuned for that, if I can ever catch a calm day for a good bench test.

video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IrLPnBC4kh0)

Always love some slow-mo video of the big bang!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on December 12, 2018, 11:06:36 AM
Bad news, everybody. American Eagle has discontinued their "Tipped Varmint" loads and started to produce a new version with a hollow-point instead of the v-max. I am very disappointed, since this was my go-to load for the DB15CCB :main_undecided_ncc: I'm going to start looking for a replacement load and will keep everybody posted if I have any luck. I've been reading good things about the Ultramax .223 Remington, Nosler Ballistic Tip, 50 Grain ammo and I found some on Sportsman's Warehouse for $18 per box of 50.

(https://media.mwstatic.com/product-images/2200x1650/Primary/279/webp/279684.webp)

Fingers crossed!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: odeTOmaybe2 on January 18, 2019, 12:11:02 PM
Bad news, everybody. American Eagle has discontinued their "Tipped Varmint" loads and started to produce a new version with a hollow-point instead of the v-max. I am very disappointed, since this was my go-to load for the DB15CCB :main_undecided_ncc: I'm going to start looking for a replacement load and will keep everybody posted if I have any luck. I've been reading good things about the Ultramax .223 Remington, Nosler Ballistic Tip, 50 Grain ammo and I found some on Sportsman's Warehouse for $18 per box of 50.

(https://media.mwstatic.com/product-images/2200x1650/Primary/279/webp/279684.webp)

Fingers crossed!

I couldn't get the Ultramax to group very well.  About 2" at 100 yards.  I had good luck with the Freedom Munitions V-Max 55g.  I believe they are currently out of stock (and going through some financial problems).  The best round I have found is the Hornady 55g V-max.  It runs about $22 for a box of 50.  It's worth the extra few dollars in my opinion.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 19, 2019, 01:43:13 PM
I had a chance to hit the range over the weekend to test some replacement ammo for my beloved AE223 Tipped Varmint loads. The contestants were 1) UltraMax 223 V-max 50 grain, 2) Hornady's American Gunner JHP 55 grain, and 3) Remington's AccuTip 50 grain. Here's where they ended up at 100 and 200 yards:

(http://gdurl.com/geWR)

(http://gdurl.com/xYMw)

I was really surprised - and this is the second time - that the Remington stuff was shooting so poorly. That was always the best stuff, just slightly better than the American Eagle version, but it was three times the cost so I just stuck with AE. Now it's spraying all over the place. The only variable that changed was that I added the Limbsaver Sharpshooter X-ring "barrel tuner" about 2" back from the end of the barrel. Admittedly, I did not do any scientific work in the placement of this device and I've read that a little movement in either direction can have a noticeable impact on shot locations. Anyways, maybe this positioning just happens to be better for the Ultramax than the others. I guess I'd rather be lucky than good, again since the Ultramax is a lot cheaper to buy than the Remington.

Now that I know the Ultramax shoots well for my rig, and when the weather warms up a bit, I'll spend some time playing with the location of the Limbsaver piece to see if I can find a sweet spot. I also read that you can add small rubber o-rings to the barrel, adding or subtracting them until you find the right combination. I may leave the big Limbsaver piece where it's at and then try adding o-rings in front of it, seeing which number of o-rings yields the best results. More to come on that in the next round, though. For now, it's off to the woods to control the coyote population!

(http://gdurl.com/cftY)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 20, 2019, 09:47:54 AM
I couldn't get the Ultramax to group very well.  About 2" at 100 yards.  I had good luck with the Freedom Munitions V-Max 55g.  I believe they are currently out of stock (and going through some financial problems).  The best round I have found is the Hornady 55g V-max.  It runs about $22 for a box of 50.  It's worth the extra few dollars in my opinion.
That's good to know, @odeTOmaybe2, because I just went to the Ultramax website (https://www.ultramaxammunition.com/home.html) and found some bad news:

(http://gdurl.com/QRaw)

Back to the drawing board...
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 20, 2019, 03:19:27 PM
Man... it's tough to find 50gr ballistic tip rounds out there anymore. I thought there were a bunch, but the pickin's seem slim now. I put in an order for some Fiocchi Extrema 223 50gr V-Max ammo to see what it does in my DB15CCB. It seems to be highly recommended by folks online. I found it for $20 per 50 but shipping is $10, so if my sample works, then I may have to order bulk and stockpile a bit. I'm sick of having to change loads :main_idiot2_ncc:

www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/fiocchi-extrema-223-remington-v-max-50-grain-50-rounds?a=938945

I will report back on how it does at the range, next time I can get out there.

(https://d3gxe0jmvtuxbc.cloudfront.net/images/Product/large/3668.jpg)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: odeTOmaybe2 on February 21, 2019, 10:11:16 AM
That's good to know, @odeTOmaybe2, because I just went to the Ultramax website (https://www.ultramaxammunition.com/home.html) and found some bad news:


Back to the drawing board...

Man you are having some bad luck.. every round that is working well for you gets discontinued!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: odeTOmaybe2 on February 21, 2019, 10:18:52 AM
Man... it's tough to find 50gr ballistic tip rounds out there anymore. I thought there were a bunch, but the pickin's seem slim now. I put in an order for some Fiocchi Extrema 223 50gr V-Max ammo to see what it does in my DB15CCB. It seems to be highly recommended by folks online. I found it for $20 per 50 but shipping is $10, so if my sample works, then I may have to order bulk and stockpile a bit. I'm sick of having to change loads :main_idiot2_ncc:

www.sportsmansguide.com/product/index/fiocchi-extrema-223-remington-v-max-50-grain-50-rounds?a=938945

I will report back on how it does at the range, next time I can get out there.

Let us know what you find out.  Btw, I always check Academy for ammo, because they have free shipping over $25.

https://www.academy.com/shop/pdp/fiocchi-extrema-v-max-22-remington-50-grain-centerfire-rifle-ammunition#repChildCatid=3100633

Looks like they are selling it for $24, which might save you a few dollars.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 21, 2019, 11:37:41 AM
Btw, I always check Academy for ammo, because they have free shipping over $25. Looks like they are selling it for $24, which might save you a few dollars.
Good tip, thanks! Sadly they will not ship ammo to the "great" state of Illinois, so that's not an option for me :-(
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: odeTOmaybe2 on February 22, 2019, 10:22:00 AM
Good tip, thanks! Sadly they will not ship ammo to the "great" state of Illinois, so that's not an option for me :-(

Yikes, I'm your next door neighbor in Indiana and they will ship to me all day long  :main_wink:
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: pecospuppy on February 24, 2019, 07:15:06 PM
What do you like about the 50 grain bullet?  55 seems light enough for me.  62 grain is good too.  77 grain I like but haven't tried it for extended ranges so I don't know if it will stabilize out of a 16 inch 1:8 twist barrel. 

Tell me why you like 50 grain.

I've been shooting this stuff.  Cheaper than most and so far no issues.
https://www.midwayusa.com/product/102080187/winchester-usa-ammunition-556x45mm-nato-55-grain-full-metal-jacket-value-pack?utm_source=hot-buy&utm_medium=email&utm_content=main-image-link&utm_campaign=winchester-556

Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 25, 2019, 10:44:28 AM
What do you like about the 50 grain bullet?
When I bought this gun my goals were to get the cheapest AR shooting the cheapest factory ammo that would perform well on coyotes and other varmints. The only exception to my rule was on the glass; I ended up with the Nikon M-223 4-16x Nikoplex scope. Their Nikoplex reticle is calibrated with turrets markings to set POI for 100, 150, 200, 300, 400, 500, and 600 yards, assuming that you use 223 ammo with 55 grain ballistic tips firing at 3,240 FPS. The only trouble is that they are using longer 20-22" barrels when they're calibrating the settings, and the velocities are not as high out of a 16" barrel. What I found was that by dropping to a 50-grain ballistic tip bullet the rated velocities were higher, and then when they too come out a little slower than rated from my shorter barrel, they are at the correct speed for the Nikoplex. Anyways, in addition to that experimentation, I like to use fur-friendly loads and a 50-grain V-Max does the trick on a coyote without any trouble and usually doesn't come out the other side, depending on where you hit them. When I first bought this gun I seem to remember a number of options where manufacturers were loading (or reloading) 50-grain ballistic tip bullets, but several of those have dropped off the market in the last two years. Thus my recent searches for new ammo to replace my past favorites.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on February 26, 2019, 11:00:05 AM
I don't know if it will stabilize out of a 16 inch 1:8 twist barrel.
This is an interesting point with DB. They show (and have for years) that their DB15 rifles have a 1:8 RH twist. I'm pretty sure I asked their customer support folks about this last year and they came back saying that it's actually a 1:9 RH twist. Maybe they've changed their specs, or maybe they just refuse to update their website accordingly, but something to keep in mind for those looking to shoot heavier bullets.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: odeTOmaybe2 on February 26, 2019, 02:29:17 PM
This is an interesting point with DB. They show (and have for years) that their DB15 rifles have a 1:8 RH twist. I'm pretty sure I asked their customer support folks about this last year and they came back saying that it's actually a 1:9 RH twist. Maybe they've changed their specs, or maybe they just refuse to update their website accordingly, but something to keep in mind for those looking to shoot heavier bullets.

Same here, I have the DB15CB, which states on every website (Including Diamondback's) as having a 1:8" Twist.  But when I got it home, I noticed my barrel is stamped with 1:9".  I also asked DB about this and was told that the stamping was correct.  I was actually pretty disappointed about this, because I wanted to have the versatility of the 1:8".  But, I have been happy with DB as a whole and I really only shoot 55gr & 62gr, and I haven't had stability issues with either one.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on May 05, 2019, 07:54:20 PM
Finally had a good day at the range, after the flood waters subsided here in Northern Illinois. I felt like I had an exceptionally solid rest this time around and there were only light winds in the 5-8mph zone, so a good day to do some more head-to-head ammo testing. This is the list of what I shot:

 * Remington Accutip-V 50gr
 * Ultramax Vmax 50gr (discontinued)
 * Hornady Varmint Express 55gr
 * American Eagle Tipped Varmint 50gr (discontinued)
 * American Gunner 55gr (JHP - just for fun)
 * Fiocchi Extrema 50gr

I just put stickers on a big piece of paper and shot at 100 yards for these, so all of the groupings are in the same image. I shot 5 of each ammo that I had with me, although I only had 3 rounds of the Remington Accuptip-V 50gr stuff left. Here's how it shook out...

(https://gdurl.com/IVdv)

Frankly, at 100 yards, it's tough to tell the difference between these as this list includes the ammo that I've liked best with my DB15CCB so far. The little boxes printed on the paper are 1" squares, so most of these are within 1 MOA. This is the first time I've shot the Fiocchi stuff and I was really happy with the results; I think it arguable did the best of these options. I also thought it was funny to see the Remington stuff climbing like you can see, where the first shot was 3" low and the second was 2" low and the third was 1" low. I've seen this before (see previous post) with their ammo so it must be more susceptible to the slightly warmer barrel, although I was shooting one at a time with decent time between shots for the barrel to slightly cool.

I think I'm going to officially switch my go-to varmint / coyote ammo to the Fiocchi Extrema 50 grain ballistic tip with boat-tail. Next I'm going to play around with the exact location of the dampener on the barrel to see if I can tune these groupings any tighter. More to come on that soon, as long as the weather plays along!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: pecospuppy on May 05, 2019, 08:13:16 PM
Do you prefer 50g?  If so why?

I'm thinking I like a slightly heavier round than the 55g.  I have some 62g and 75g coming in to test against 55g and see how much drop I get.  I'm thinking as long as I stay above 2200 FPS heavier is better.  What do you know that I don't?
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on May 05, 2019, 10:05:34 PM
What do you know that I don't?
Nothing magical about 50gr for performance, more of an equipment choice for me. Take a look at a couple of the recent posts on this thread; the details are there to answer your question. I've only shot up to 62gr with this gun and they were good enough to kill hogs. Otherwise I haven't played around north of 55gr, so I'll be interested in your results!
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: pecospuppy on May 05, 2019, 10:29:35 PM
...Take a look at a couple of the recent posts on this thread; the details are there to answer your question. ...
Yeah, I remember you saying the lighter faster 50g loads match your glass, but you also say you can still shoot hogs.  I'd think coyotes would about be the limit.  Some states won't even let a 556 shoot hogs no matter what the bullet weight.  .30 is the limit.  You have to go 300 blackout in those states or 7.62. 

I don't use mine to hunt yet, but hogs are a little out of a 50g bullets effectiveness I would think.  They'll run off and bleed to death.  That is why I am looking into 62g.  I think 77g goes below 2200 FPS in a 16 inch barrel so I'm looking for the right load between 55g and 77g.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on May 05, 2019, 11:52:19 PM
Some states won't even let a 556 shoot hogs no matter what the bullet weight.
I sighted my scope in for 62gr loads on the hog trip. Only need to be good for 50-100 yards. Check out the first page of this thread. Hit them just behind the ear and they drop like a stone, no blood trailing required. Have been hearing of wounded hogs with larger but slower bullets. Coyotes though, I want to be good out to 400 yards. 50 grains is plenty, even at that range.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: duffy on May 14, 2019, 06:30:10 PM
I've only used two different weight bullets so far (55 gn factory FMJ's and 40 gn Vmax that I reload). I think the 40 grain Vmax is more accurate at 100 yards than the 55 gn FMJ's. My DB15 has a 1 in 8 twist with a 16" barrel. I have yet to try any of the 55 FMJ's in my Howa 1500 to see it they work differently in a long barrel with a 1 in 14 twist.

Any thoughts?
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on May 15, 2019, 11:47:41 AM
My DB15 has a 1 in 8 twist with a 16" barrel.
Have you verified that with the markings on the barrel? Scroll up to posts #50 and 51 in this thread. Diamondback shows 1:8 on their website but their customer support and the markings on the barrels both confirm 1:9 twist. I don't think it matters for 55gr and may even be a little better for 40-50gr but 1:9 might be an issue for 65gr+ bullets. I wish they would update their website; it is misleading for a lot of people and some folks may be upset if they plan on shooting heavier bullets.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: duffy on May 15, 2019, 06:05:35 PM
Stamped right on the top of the barrel just back of the flash suppressor.....says "5.56 NATO   1 in 8 RH twist". Stamped on the right side of the mag well says "Multi Cal".
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on May 16, 2019, 09:50:08 AM
Stamped right on the top of the barrel just back of the flash suppressor.....says "5.56 NATO - 1 in 8 RH twist."
Interesting! How long ago did you buy your rifle?
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: duffy on May 16, 2019, 08:07:10 PM
Less than a month ago and this place moves it's stock pretty fast. My model is a DB15CCMLB.......the Diamondback web site advertises it as a 1 in 8.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on May 17, 2019, 10:15:54 AM
The Diamondback web site advertises it as a 1 in 8.
Well I'm glad DB finally sells 1:8 when they advertise 1:8. For years the DB15 models advertised 1:8 on their website but the guns were actually stamped 1:9 on the barrels. Sounds like that discrepancy has been fixed now.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: duffy on May 17, 2019, 05:13:21 PM
Yep............
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on May 20, 2019, 10:54:09 AM
Well in that case, you shouldn't have any trouble stabilizing 62gr bullets and may have luck higher than that as well. Like you mentioned before, I wonder if that will help or hurt your efforts with lighter bullets like 45-50gr. I hope you'll run some testing at the range and let us all know what you find out :-)
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: duffy on May 20, 2019, 02:34:13 PM
The only two weights I have tried so far are 55 FMJ's and 40 Hornady V-Max. The V-max (hand loads) seem to be more accurate than the 55's, at least at 100 yards.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on May 20, 2019, 03:02:10 PM
Good to know! If you look in my earlier posts, I did some *fairly* extensive ammo testing. I was shocked at how differently ammo would perform across name-brand manufacturers. Even several different types of 50 and 55gr v-max type bullets; some did exceptionally well while others looked shotgun patterns. Unfortunately it's not a cheap exercise but it's kind of fun to try different stuff and see what matches best for your gun. I would have suggested to start with the options I found to be most accurate, but since your barrel is a faster twist than mine, it might not give you that much of a head-start in your research.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: duffy on May 21, 2019, 01:01:18 PM
I did some internet research on bullet weight vs rifling twist rate and it seems that more twist is preferable to not enough. Too slow of twist will not stabilize the bullet but too much twist for the weight doesn't seem to effect much. I was using the criteria for a 16" barrel.

I have a Howa 1500 in .223 and it has a 1-12 twist. I've only shot the above mentioned bullets in it also.......both seem to be about as accurate.

I have shot a lot of muzzle loaders in the past and the twist rates for them are "important" if not critical. Patched round balls require a long twist rate (1-62 or more) and conical bullets require a tighter twist (1-48 or less). These are relatively slow and very heavy bullets. It is possible to fudge by changing the powder load (ie, shoot conical bullets out of a 1-62 barrel). Using patched round balls out of a 38" 1-62 barrel I was able to get over 2000 fps at 3' from the muzzle. Not bad for a charcoal burner.

Smokeless powder requires more delicate conditions I think. The tools necessary to measure performance are a bit beyond my ability/desire. If it goes "bang" and I hit the target about where I aim I'm happy.

Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on May 21, 2019, 01:34:20 PM
both seem to be about as accurate
If you have the ability to shoot at longer ranges, you might see more of a difference. My limited understanding of "over spin" is that it creates excess drag and therefore the drop would be greater as the bullet gets further out.

I have a Remington 700 VSSF in 223 that I use on prairie dogs and it's 1:12 twist. Granted it's a long barrel, but there must be a reason that they have a slower twist on those guns versus the ARs that are all in the 1:7-1:9 range. Maybe the faster twist helps stabilize in a shorter barrel. Maybe manufacturers of ARs expect shooters to use heavier bullets. Not sure...
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: duffy on May 22, 2019, 01:42:34 PM
A lot of my prairie dog shooting is 300-500 yards and the range I shoot at has 300 and 800 yard ranges. I zeroed the scope on the Howa at 300 yards and then tried the 800 yard target. The 55's were a bit better at 800 yards (less drop) than the 40's were. That may have been due to the 55's being factory loaded and the 40's a "medium" hand load.

I have not shot any further than 100 yards with the DB........seeing the target with non-magnified sights is getting more difficult the older I get. I'm going to try the 200 yard range the next time I visit the range .....maybe even the 300 just for grins.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on July 28, 2019, 08:18:40 PM
After a year of procrastinating, I finally decided to test my 45-degree offset iron sights. I put these on to help deal with coyotes that seem to always sneak in at 20 yards when my scope is cranked up to 16x looking at an incoming dog on the horizon. If you try to dial the scope down, the coyote will probably bust you. The beauty of the offset sights is that you can just cant the gun to the side and then you're in business for close range. I don't have a lot of experience with iron sights, to be honest. I shot the first time with these sights while standing, freehand, iron sights at 50 yards and this is what happened.

(https://gdurl.com/vdMc)

That's plenty good enough for a coyote, so I think my backup sights are in good shape :main_good:
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: pecospuppy on July 28, 2019, 09:47:37 PM
Yep, good enough.  Looks like you are pulling a little with your trigger hand.  I'm no expert (and maybe you are), but that is what I've been told is the reason for a down and to the left group from a right handed shooter.  If you remove your thumb from around the handle and so you are shooting with your trigger hand thumb on the side of the gun instead of around the handle, you might see your aim improve.  It's worth a try.
Title: Re: Diamondback DB15CCB Rifle Journal
Post by: superbeau on July 29, 2019, 11:06:00 AM
Looks like you are pulling a little with your trigger hand.
It's ironic because I am currently working on improving low/left hits with my pistol shooting. Apparently it's a "thing" and we subconsciously push low/left when we squeeze our hands tighter on the grip in anticipation of the recoil. I blame these rifle hits on shooting off-hand and being a little wobbly. Next time I'm out, I'll try again with the rifle sights in a stable rest. I'd love to get a micro-red dot as my offset sight but I think I'll wait until the prices come down to earth.